How Brexit could affect UK energy

How Brexit could affect UK energy

It’s expected that many UK energy companies could raise their energy tariffs on average by 3-5%, if a ‘no-deal’ Brexit is to take place. Opting for a fixed term tariff could protect you from this.

How Brexit could affect UK/ EU imports and exports

Brexit has been a key subject in the UK news over the past few months. As we are seeing the decisions of parliament and the European Union (EU) develop and close over the next few months, it is key to ensure all outcomes have been ventured from a business provider perspective to ensure minimal impact is passed onto our customers.

“Average figures from 2017 show that 44% of UK exports went to the EU and 53% of all UK imports came from the EU. Implications may mean that a ‘no-deal’ Brexit may result in hard border on the island of Ireland.– EuroNews 2019

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) are the global organisation who manage worldwide trade agreements. The WTO have a general rule that each member must grant the same market access/ to avoid bias trade – except developing countries and those that have free trade agreements. Trade experts suggest that the EU could not treat the UK differently to other states in relation to the new Brexit deal.

“The Confederation of British Industry (CBI) estimates that with no deal, 90% of the UK’s goods exports to the EU by value would face tariffs. The average tariff on UK exports to the bloc would be 4.3 percent, it calculates, while the average on imports from the EU into the UK would be around 5.7 percent. Tariffs in some sectors – for example in agriculture and food, the car industry and textiles – would be “significantly higher” – EuroNews 2019 Read more

With the strong possibility that the UK will be leaving the European Union and a decision still not being made on an UK level with MP party leaders disagreeing with Theresa May’s propositions. The UK parliament must agree and present a UK proposal to the European Union leader Donald Tusk by the 30th of June 2019. At current Brexit could have many outcomes and UK residents may want to prepare.

How it will affect energy customers

This percentage tariff increase on UK goods will ‘in most cases’ be directly transferred onto customers costings. Most UK energy companies could raise their energy tariffs on average by 3-5%, if a ‘no-deal’ Brexit is to take place and energy is outsourced. In order to protect yourself from energy price rises, we advise energy customers to be on a fixed term tariff, protecting you from susceptible raises.

The outcome of Brexit is still to be decided, however Brexit should have a minimal effect on Eversmart Energy customers.  Eversmart’s electricity is 100% UK sourced and will not be directly affected from leaving the European Union. Our gas is partially imported from the European union zone. However, if you are on an agreed fixed tariff with Eversmart any tariff charge changes due to Brexit will be absorbed by us.

For further information, visit www.eversmartenergy.co.uk

Grace Bowden (Senior marketing executive)

Halogen light bulb ban – what you need to know

halogen bulbs

Halogen light bulbs are to be phased out from the beginning of September 2018, in Britain and across the EU, with consumers being encouraged to switch to more efficient LED bulbs instead. What does this this mean for you and your household? Read on as we answer your questions…

Why the change?

Halogen bulbs are less energy-efficient than LEDs. It is hoped that the change will reduce energy use and cut carbon emissions across Europe. According to the Energy Saving Trust, a typical halogen bulb costs around £11 per year to run, whereas an equivalent LED bulb would cost just £2 – making it over 5 times more efficient. Halogen bulbs also tend to fail after around 2 years; LEDs on the other hand can last for up to 20 years.

Old incandescent bulbs – which were even less efficient than halogens – were phased out back in 2009.

How will the ban come into effect?

Shops will no longer be able to order new halogen bulbs after 1st September. They will however be permitted to sell their current stock, so you might still see them on the shelves for some time afterwards.

Do I have to replace my old bulbs right now?

Don’t worry – you can keep using your old bulbs until they burn out, then replace them with LEDs as and when you need to. The ban prevents shops from ordering & selling new halogen bulbs, but it doesn’t stop you from using the ones you already own.

Which LED bulbs should I buy?

The brightness of LED lights is described in ‘lumens’ – which may take some getting used to if you’ve grown up thinking of bulbs in terms of watts. The chart below compares the wattage of traditional bulbs to the lumen level of their energy-efficient counterparts:

light bulb comparison
The wattage of traditional light bulbs compared to energy efficient versions.

As you can see, an old-style 60W bulb is the equivalent of around 700-900 lumens. Most bulb packaging includes a ‘traditional’ wattage for easy comparison.

How much do LED lights cost?

There’s no getting around it – LED bulbs are expensive. But bear in mind that after the initial purchase, they cost less to run and they will last much longer.

Are LEDs compatible with my current light fittings?

Generally speaking, yes. LED bulbs are available with ‘bayonet’ and ‘screw’ caps, just like traditional halogen and incandescent bulbs. In most cases you can just take out the old bulb and pop in an LED without any issues – however we have heard reports of problems with ceiling lights flickering when the bulbs are replaced with LEDs. You should consult an electrician if you need advice.

Will this be affected by Brexit?

At the moment, the UK is still part of the European Union and therefore the EU rules on light bulbs still apply. And it’s unlikely that manufacturers will make special bulbs just for the UK once we have left the EU.