What is a kilowatt hour? Your questions answered

What is a kilowatt hour?

If you’ve looked at your energy bill lately, you’ve probably come across the term ‘kilowatt hour’. It’s a confusing piece of jargon that trips may people up. In this article, we’ll explain what a kilowatt hour is and answer some other common questions.

What is a kilowatt hour?

Put very simply, a kilowatt hour (or kWh) is a unit of energy. Much like you pay for petrol by the litre or phone calls by the minute, you pay for gas and electricity by the kilowatt hour.

electricity meter
A meter displaying electricity use in kWh. Image source.

When you’re shopping around for gas & electricity, suppliers have to quote their prices in pence per kilowatt hour (Ofgem says so). This makes it easier to compare prices and find a good deal.

For those interested in the technical definition, here it is:

1 kilowatt hour is the amount of energy a 1kW device would use if it was run for one hour – approximately 3.6 megajoules.

For example, a 1 kW heater left running for 1 hour would consume 1 kWh (or 1 unit) of energy.

What is the cost per kilowatt hour?

There isn’t a standard price – it depends on both your energy supplier and the tariff you are currently signed up to.

Unit prices for electricity can range from around 12-18 pence per kWh. Gas is around 3-4 pence per kWh.

Note that you also pay a standing charge with most energy tariffs – you can find more information about standing charges here.

What’s the difference between a kilowatt and a kilowatt hour?

A kilowatt is a unit of power. The kilowatt (kW) rating of an appliance describes how quickly it uses energy.

A kilowatt hour is a unit of energy. It describes an amount of energy consumed.

Put it this way – if kilowatt was like the speed of a car, a kilowatt hour would be how far it has travelled.

How do I find out how many kWh I use?

Find out my kilowatt hour use

If you are shopping around for a new energy supplier, it’s useful to know how many kWh your home uses in a month. You can get this information from your current provider – either by looking at a paper bill or by checking your online account.

If you can’t find your exact usage, you can still compare prices using something called Typical Domestic Consumption Values – or TDCVs.

TDCVs are calculated by Ofgem using data from typical households, as shown below:

Fuel Usage kWh (annual)
Gas Low 8,000
Medium 12,000
High 17,000
Electricity Low 1,900
Medium 3,100
High 4,600

Source: Ofgem

For example, a small family living in a 3-bedroom house would probably be classed as a ‘medium use’ home. They could expect to use around 12,000 kWh of gas and 3,100 kWh of electricity in a year.

How do I reduce my energy consumption?

Concerned that your kWh use is too high and costing too much? There are two things you can do:

  1. Claim a free smart meter – this will help you monitor your energy use and take control of your spending.
  2. Switch to a cheaper energy supplier. Eversmart Energy offer some of the best value energy tariffs on the market. You can enter you details and get a quote in under two minutes here.

How to save water around the home

saving water

Did you know that the average household in England & Wales spends almost £400 a year on water bills? Or that around 15% of a typical household energy bill goes towards heating water? There are significant savings to be made if you can control your water use – read on to find out how…

Reducing water use

Use a water efficient showerhead

‘Low flow’ showerheads can make it feel like water is coming out faster and with more power than it really is. This will reduce the amount of water used per shower, saving you money on your water and energy bills.

Note that low flow showerheads shouldn’t be fitted on electric showers.

Buy water efficient appliances

Next time you’re shopping for a new washing machine or dishwasher, look out for the Water Efficient Product Label. Buying an efficient appliance model can lead to big savings.

unified water label
The new Unified Water Label. Image source: europeanwaterlabel.eu

Turn off the taps

A running tap goes through around 6 litres of water per minute! Don’t leave the tap running while brushing your teeth, shaving or washing the dishes.

Use a reduced capacity bath

Next time you remodel your bathroom, think about fitting a low-capacity bath. These specially designed bathtubs require less water to fill while still feeling just as comfortable.

It goes without saying that showers are much more water-efficient than baths, but if you are more of a bath person then a reduced capacity bath could be the way to go!

Fix that dripping tap

A dripping tap is more than just a nuisance – it can sneakily waste water and add to your energy bill.

Re-use water

Why use tap water to fill up your watering can, when you could use collected rainwater from a water butt instead?

Saving hot water

Insulate your hot water cylinder and pipes

If your home has a hot water cylinder (it may not if you have a combi-boiler), putting a well-fitting insulation jacket around it could save you around £20 a year – or even more if you have an expensive immersion heater. Insulating your pipes will also help save money & energy.

Use your heating controls

Don’t waste money heating water when you don’t need it. Instead, take the time to familiarise yourself with your heating controls and timers.

Upgrade your boiler

If you have an older gas boiler, it may be time to upgrade it to a modern, energy efficient model. The Energy Saving Trust estimates that you could save anywhere from £55-£200 per year by upgrading.

New boilers aren’t cheap, but there may be government schemes & grants available in your area.

 

That’s our list of water saving tips. If you have any more ideas, let us know in the comments section!

 

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When can you switch energy suppliers without paying a penalty?

exit fees

If you try to switch energy suppliers before your contract is up, you could end up paying a penalty for leaving early – also known as an exit fee. Some energy suppliers can charge up to a whopping £75 per fuel! Read on to find out how to avoid getting stung.

Don’t let the fear of paying a fee stop you from getting a better deal!

Find out which type of tariff you are on

Exit fees usually only apply to fixed-term tariffs. These tariffs have a fixed price and a set end date.

Standard variable tariffs do not have exit fees, which means you are free to switch whenever you like without having to pay a penalty.

If you’re not sure which type of tariff you are on:

  • Look at a recent bill or email from your supplier
  • Log in to your online account
  • Call your energy supplier and ask

Check when your tariff is due to end

Your energy supplier cannot charge you an exit fee during the last 49 days of your contract. If you have less than 49 days left, you can go ahead and switch without being penalised.

Your supplier should write to you within the final 42-49 days to let you know your tariff is coming to an end.

Do the maths

Even if you do have to pay an exit fee, it might be worth it in the long run if the money you save by switching out-weighs the penalty.

You will need to check with your current supplier to find out what you will be charged. The table below shows the exit fees for some of the bigger energy companies:

Supplier Exit Fee
British Gas £30–£40 per fuel
Npower £20–£50 per fuel
E.ON £30–£75 per fuel
EDF £10–£40 per fuel
SSE £25 per fuel
Scottish Power £30 per fuel
Eversmart Energy No exit fees!

What if I stay with the same supplier?

If you let your tariff end without switching, your supplier should automatically move you onto their cheapest standard tariff. Ofgem rules state that they can’t put you on a fixed-term tariff with a termination fee.

It is very unlikely that you would have to pay an exit fee if you change tariffs but stay with the same supplier.

In summary:

  • You do not have to pay exit fees if you are on a standard variable tariff
  • You do not have to pay exit fees if your tariff ends in the next 49 days

Ready to switch?

If you are currently with one of the ‘big 6’ suppliers, you could save up to £400 per year by switching to Eversmart. Get started here.

 

The information in this article was correct at the time of publishing.

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Are Smart Meters Compulsory?

smart meter installation

It’s a question we get asked a lot – are smart meters compulsory? Do I have to get a smart meter? Will the government make me get one? In this article, we’ll tackle some common questions & concerns about the smart meter roll-out.

If you’re unsure what a smart meter is, or whether you already have one, we’d recommend reading this article first – What is a smart meter and how do they work?

Do I have to get a smart meter?

The short answer is no – smart meters are completely optional, and you are not obliged to get one. You can still switch to Eversmart Energy and opt-out of getting a smart meter if you wish.

Some background

In 2016 the government began the smart meter roll-out. It is their goal to put a smart meter in every home & business in the UK by 2020. Smart meters are designed to save consumers money and make the energy grid more modern & efficient.

Energy suppliers (including Eversmart Energy) are responsible for supplying & fitting smart metering equipment at no up-front cost to the consumer. Suppliers are required “to take all reasonable steps to roll out smart meters to all of their domestic and small business customers by the end of 2020”, as stated on the Ofgem website.

As a result, we offer a smart meter to every new Eversmart customer. It’s no secret that we think smart meters are great and that everybody should have one – but we won’t force you to have one installed if you don’t want it.

What does Ofgem say?

The following is taken from Ofgem’s website:

“While we and the government think that all consumers will benefit from smart meters, they aren’t compulsory and you can choose not to have one.”

“Choosing not to have a smart meter may mean you don’t have access to all the available tariffs on the market, some of which could be cheaper.”

“If you don’t want to have a smart meter now, you will still be able to have one installed for free at a later date.”

Why you should get a smart meter

Although they are not compulsory, smart meters offer a huge range of benefits. We’ve included a brief list of some of them below:

  • No more estimated bills. Your energy bills will be accurate and based on your real usage.
  • No need to submit manual meter readings to your supplier
  • You will also receive a free in-home display unit, showing your energy use & spending in near real-time
  • Smart meters are much more convenient for pre-pay customers. You can top-up remotely via app, phone or SMS

If you do opt to get a smart meter, it will be supplied & fitted for free by a qualified smart meter engineer. The installation process is fairly straightforward and is usually done in under two hours.

More information

If you have more questions about smart meters, there’s plenty more information & resources on our website:

8 Smart Meter Myths: Busted

smart meter myths

When it comes to smart meters, there’s a lot of incorrect information, misconceptions and myths out there— from worries about safety to concerns about data security and everything in between. In this article, we’ll address some of the most common smart meter myths.

Myth no. 1: My smart meter will spy on me

Fact: Smart meters are secure and data is never shared with third parties

Smart meters are designed to collect your gas & electricity usage data and nothing else. They simply don’t have access to any other kind of personal data.

When that data is transmitted to your energy supplier, it uses a secure encrypted connection – similar to that used by online banking. The communication infrastructure is provided by the Data Communication Company, which is regulated by Ofgem.

Your data is secure and is never passed on to third parties.

Myth no. 2: My energy supplier will force me to get a smart meter

Fact: Smart meters are completely optional

Smart meters are not compulsory, and your energy supplier cannot force you to get one if you don’t want it.

Here’s what it says on the Ofgem website:

“While we and the government think that all consumers will benefit from smart meters, they aren’t compulsory and you can choose not to have one.”

“Choosing not to have a smart meter may mean you don’t have access to all the available tariffs on the market, some of which could be cheaper.”

“If you don’t want to have a smart meter now, you will still be able to have one installed for free at a later date.”

You can find more information in this article titled “Are Smart Meters Compulsory?”

Myth no. 3: Smart meters will make you ill

Fact: Smart meters are just as safe as any other digital device

There is no need to be concerned about your health with a smart meter in the house. They are subject to the same strict UK and EU safety regulations as any other consumer electrical product.

They do emit radio waves, but the levels are perfectly safe – and lower than your mobile phone or your Wi-Fi router.

The government has published a very detailed article about smart meters and your health, which you can read here.

Myth no. 4: You can’t change suppliers once you have a smart meter

Fact: You are free to switch suppliers whenever you like

You are free to switch energy suppliers whether you have a traditional meter or a smart meter.

One note – if you have a first-generation smart meter, it could make switching a little more complicated. If on the other hand you have a second-gen meter, you can switch seamlessly between suppliers. Contact your current provider if you’re unsure.

Myth no. 5: Smart meters are expensive

Fact: Your energy supplier should provide & fit your smart meter free of charge

Energy companies are obligated to offer smart meters to their customers, and they should supply and fit them for free. The cost of the equipment and installation is covered by your monthly energy bills.

Myth no. 6: Smart meters cause fires

Fact: Smart meters a rigorously tested and fitted by qualified engineers

Smart meter manufacturers must satisfy the safety requirements and standards set out in the National Electric Safety Code (NESC). Your meter will also be fitted by a qualified, expert engineer.

This makes the risk of fires or explosions extremely unlikely.

Myth no. 7: You can’t get a smart meter if you rent

Fact: Tenants have the right to choose their energy supplier and can get a smart meter

As a tenant, if you’re the one who pays the gas & electric bills, then you have the right to choose your own energy supplier. You can also choose whether or not to get a smart meter.

Strictly speaking, your energy meter belongs to your energy supplier – not you, not the house and not your landlord – so you are free to get the old meter taken out and replaced with a smart meter. Although your landlord can’t stop you, it’s advisable to let them know what you’re doing.

Myth no. 8: Smart meters don’t really offer any benefits

Fact: Smart meters give you accurate bills and control over your energy usage

For a start, they give you completely accurate energy bills. That means no more estimated bills, and no surprises if you have under or over-paid. In addition, your in-home display gives you a near real-time view of your energy use, displayed in pounds and pence. This gives you the power to identify waste, make smarter choices and reduce your spending.

You can claim your free smart meter from Eversmart Energy here.

Halogen light bulb ban – what you need to know

halogen bulbs

Halogen light bulbs are to be phased out from the beginning of September 2018, in Britain and across the EU, with consumers being encouraged to switch to more efficient LED bulbs instead. What does this this mean for you and your household? Read on as we answer your questions…

Why the change?

Halogen bulbs are less energy-efficient than LEDs. It is hoped that the change will reduce energy use and cut carbon emissions across Europe. According to the Energy Saving Trust, a typical halogen bulb costs around £11 per year to run, whereas an equivalent LED bulb would cost just £2 – making it over 5 times more efficient. Halogen bulbs also tend to fail after around 2 years; LEDs on the other hand can last for up to 20 years.

Old incandescent bulbs – which were even less efficient than halogens – were phased out back in 2009.

How will the ban come into effect?

Shops will no longer be able to order new halogen bulbs after 1st September. They will however be permitted to sell their current stock, so you might still see them on the shelves for some time afterwards.

Do I have to replace my old bulbs right now?

Don’t worry – you can keep using your old bulbs until they burn out, then replace them with LEDs as and when you need to. The ban prevents shops from ordering & selling new halogen bulbs, but it doesn’t stop you from using the ones you already own.

Which LED bulbs should I buy?

The brightness of LED lights is described in ‘lumens’ – which may take some getting used to if you’ve grown up thinking of bulbs in terms of watts. The chart below compares the wattage of traditional bulbs to the lumen level of their energy-efficient counterparts:

light bulb comparison
The wattage of traditional light bulbs compared to energy efficient versions.

As you can see, an old-style 60W bulb is the equivalent of around 700-900 lumens. Most bulb packaging includes a ‘traditional’ wattage for easy comparison.

How much do LED lights cost?

There’s no getting around it – LED bulbs are expensive. But bear in mind that after the initial purchase, they cost less to run and they will last much longer.

Are LEDs compatible with my current light fittings?

Generally speaking, yes. LED bulbs are available with ‘bayonet’ and ‘screw’ caps, just like traditional halogen and incandescent bulbs. In most cases you can just take out the old bulb and pop in an LED without any issues – however we have heard reports of problems with ceiling lights flickering when the bulbs are replaced with LEDs. You should consult an electrician if you need advice.

Will this be affected by Brexit?

At the moment, the UK is still part of the European Union and therefore the EU rules on light bulbs still apply. And it’s unlikely that manufacturers will make special bulbs just for the UK once we have left the EU.

How to keep cool and save energy this summer

summer energy efficiency

As temperatures continue to soar to record highs across the UK this week, we take a look at some easy ways to cool your home and save energy in the process.

Along with many other parts of the world, the UK is experiencing a major heatwave which shows few signs of stopping anytime soon, with temperatures consistently passing the 30°C mark for several days in a row.

That means it’s more important than ever to make your home as energy-efficient as possible as you battle the blistering heat! Remember, keeping the heat out of your home in the summer is just as important as keeping it in during the winter!

The blogging team at Alliance to Save Energy, a US energy saving organisation, has created this handy graphic explaining 8 quick & easy tips for keeping your home cool during the summer months – and how to keep your energy bills under control as you do so!

You can check out the guide below (click or tap on the image to view it in full-size).

summer energy efficiency infographic

How long does it take to switch gas and electricity supplier?

How long does it take to switch gas and electricity supplier?

In this article we’ll tackle some of the most common questions & concerns about switching to a new energy supplier – starting with one of the questions we hear the most: how long does it take to switch?

Some other questions covered in this article:

 

How long does it take to switch gas and electricity supplier?

Generally speaking, switching to Eversmart takes 21 days. We’ve outlined each step in the switching process and the typical timescales below:

Day 1: Signup

As soon as you sign up with Eversmart, either online or over the phone, we will contact your old supplier and get things moving. You don’t have to do anything at this point – just sit back and let us take care of everything for you.

Day 1–14: Smart Meter Installation

Before the switch officially goes live, we will book an appointment to come and fit your free smart meter. You can find more information about smart meters in this article.

Day 14: End of cooling off period

As with most services you sign up for in the UK, you are legally entitled to a 14 day ‘cooling off’ period where you can change your mind and cancel for any reason. If you decide Eversmart isn’t for you, just tell us before day 14.

At this point, you will also receive a reminder about your first payment.

Day 21: The switch goes live

Your account goes live and you are officially part of the Eversmart family!

 

Can my energy supplier stop me from switching?

If you pay by direct debit:

Your old supplier may be able to stop you from switching if you owe them money. If you have been in debt for over 28 days, you won’t be able to switch until you have paid them back.

If you have been in debt for less than 28 days, the debt will simply be included in your final bill.

If you have a prepayment meter:

Eversmart will take on your debt if it is less than £500. If you owe more than £500, you will have to settle the debt with your current supplier before you can make the move.

 

Can you change suppliers if you have a smart meter?

Yes. If your current supplier fitted your smart meter, you are under no obligation to stay with them. You are free to shop around and change suppliers.

Just one note – be aware that if you have a first-generation smart meter, it may not be compatible with your new supplier. If you have a second-gen smart meter, then you can switch seamlessly without any problems. If you’re unsure, ask your current energy company what type of meter you have and inform your new provider.

 

When can I switch energy supplier without a penalty?

Some gas & electricity suppliers charge an exit fee for leaving their tariff early. The fee can vary from around £5 to £30 per fuel. However, they cannot charge an exit fee during the last 42-49 days of a fixed energy tariff – so this would be the best time to switch. Your supplier should also write to you to tell you when your tariff is about to end.

At Eversmart Energy there are no exit fees on most of our tariffs. We’re confident that you’ll want to stick with us, but you have the freedom to leave whenever you like.

 

When will I receive my final bill from my old supplier?

During the switching process, we will ask you for a set of opening meter readings. These are checked & verified by a series of third parties to make sure they are accurate and that your old supplier agrees with them. Your old supplier will then send you a final bill (or credit your bank account if you have overpaid them). We can’t guarantee how long this will take, but it’s usually within 2–6 weeks.

 

Did we miss anything out? Do you have more questions about switching energy suppliers? Let us know in the comments!

What are the pros and cons of solar panels?

pros and cons of solar panels

If you’re thinking about getting solar panels installed on your rooftop, you’re not alone – there are almost 1 million solar installations in the UK already! To help you decide if solar panels are right for you, our experts have compiled a list of some of the major pros and cons of solar panels.

Note – if you’re looking for even more ways to reduce your living costs, you can save up to £400 per year by switching to Eversmart – we’re one of the UK’s cheapest energy suppliers. Get a quote in under 2 minutes here.

Read on for our top pros and cons of solar panels:

 

Advantages of solar energy

Advantages of solar energy

Save & make money

Let’s be honest – who doesn’t love saving money! A home solar system actually saves and makes money in 3 different ways:

1. Cheaper electricity bills

The more sunlight your panels soak up and turn into electricity, the less you will have to buy from your electricity supplier – which means cheaper energy bills! The exact amount you can save depends on a whole range of factors – such as the number of panels, which part of the country you live in, and your typical energy usage – but the Energy Saving Trust estimate that a typical household in the south of England could save as much £220 per year.

2. The Generation Tariff (formerly the Feed-in Tariff)

The old feed-in tariff, where the government paid you per unit of clean energy you produced, was launched in April 2010 ended in January 2016. The rates were much more generous than they are now, leading to a solar power boom in the early years of this decade.

The new scheme gives you a set amount of money per unit of electricity you produce (in pence per kilowatt hour). The rate you get varies depending on a number of factors – you can find out more on the government’s website.

The Energy Saving Trust estimate that you can make between £115–£160 per year from the generation tariff.

3. The export tariff

What happens to the electricity that you don’t get around to using? You can sell up to half of it back into the grid. The National Grid will give you 4.85p per unit of electricity sold. The EST estimate that you could make up to £105 per year from exporting.

So to summarise – a big installation in the right part of the country in the right conditions could make you up to £485 better off per year.

It’s good for the environment

Solar power is a clean and renewable energy source. It doesn’t produce carbon dioxide or any other harmful greenhouses gasses, and unlike fossil fuels it will never run out (at least not in the next few billion years!)

Experts estimate that you can save around 1.2–1.7 tonnes of carbon from being released into the atmosphere per year.

They are low-maintenance

A typical set of rooftop solar panels will last for around 25 years, making them a great long-term investment. Once installed, they require very little in the way of maintenance other than a quick clean every now and then.

They work in bad weather

It’s a common misconception that solar panels only work where it’s hot & sunny. They work just fine in the UK and they can still generate power even when it’s cloudy. The UK actually has the sixth highest solar capacity in the world!

 

Disadvantages of solar energy

Disadvantages of solar energy

Big up-front cost

Solar panels aren’t cheap – a new system typically costs around £5,000 to £8,000 to install. The good news is that energy saving products such as solar panels qualify for the reduced rate of VAT in UK – 5% instead of the usual 20%.

The system will pay for itself eventually, so to get the best value from your panels you shouldn’t be planning on moving any time soon.

It’s difficult to store energy

Solar panels only produce electricity during daylight hours, and you really have to use it there and then if you don’t want it to disappear back into the grid. You can use batteries to store the excess juice and save it for when you need it, but the battery arrays are expensive.

Technology is improving however and prices may eventually come down, making them a more attractive investment. The Tesla Powerwall is one example of domestic battery storage that could make storing solar energy more feasible in the future, but for now the battery and associated hardware costs just under £6,000.

You house & roof may not be suitable

For those of us living in the northern hemisphere, solar panels work best on a south-facing roof. If you roof faces east & west, the effectiveness of your panels will be reduced. Your roof also needs to be big enough to accommodate the panels (things like skylights, chimneys and dorma windows can get in the way) and should ideally have a pitch of around 30-40 degrees. Solar panels may not be a great idea if your roof is often shaded by trees or tall buildings.

You can’t install them yourself

Technically you could install your own DIY solar array if you really wanted to, but it’s not recommended. For starters, you won’t be immediately eligible for the generation tariff. The system would first have to be certified by an MCS-accredited engineer, who may be reluctant to sign-off a system that they didn’t install or supervise.

They might make your home more difficult to sell

According to research from consumer website Which?, two thirds of estate agents said that solar panels make no difference to a home’s value. 16% actually thought they would lower the price of a house, and just 8% thought they would increase property value.

That said, having solar panels can improve your home’s Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) and the benefits of the generation and export tariffs will be passed on to the new owners.

 

Have you recently had solar panels fitted? Do you think it was worth it? What advice would you give to somebody thinking about getting them? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below!

 

What is a standing charge? Standing charges explained

What is a standing charge?

Have you noticed that your energy tariff includes a standing charge, but you’re unsure what it means? In this article we’ll answer some of the most commonly asked questions about standing charges on your gas & electricity bills.

Standing charge definition

First things first, what is a standing charge?

Quite simply, a standing charge is the fixed cost you pay for having access to a gas and/or electricity supply.

It works a little bit like the line rental on your phone bill – you always pay it no matter what, and then you pay for individual calls on top.

The standing charge pays for things like network maintenance, meter readings, and in some cases government energy saving initiatives.

What is a typical standing charge?

It varies depending on who supplies your energy and which tariff you are on. As a very rough guide, it can range from 10p-80p per day for gas, and 5p-60p per day for electricity.

Eversmart Energy offers one of the lowest standing charges in the industry – 10.5 pence per day on most of our tariffs. You can enter your details and get a quote here.

What’s the difference between standing charge and unit rate?

Whilst the standing charge is a flat fee that stays the same from month to month, the unit rate is the cost you pay per unit of gas or electricity consumed. Going back to our phone comparison – if the standing charge is like your line rental, the unit rate is a bit like paying for individual calls.

Your unit rate is measured in pence per kilowatt-hour (p/kWh) for both gas and electricity. Again, the price per unit depends on your supplier and tariff. Together, the standing charge and the unit rate make up your energy bill.

Is there such thing as a zero standing charge tariff?

Yes. They’re not very common, but some suppliers do offer tariffs with no standing charge – including Eversmart Energy.

However… just because you don’t pay a standing charge, it doesn’t necessarily mean your bills will be cheaper.

Most people are actually better off paying a standing charge. The only people that will really benefit from a ‘no standing charge’ tariff are those who own properties that are empty for long periods of time – for example if you are away from home for several months of the year, or if you own a garage or workshop that is completely separate from your main property.

Workshop
A ‘no standing charge’ tariff may be suitable for buildings such as workshops, that are empty for long periods of time.

If your tariff has a higher standing charge, your unit rate will probably be cheaper and vice versa. If you pay no standing charge at all, your unit rate could be considerably more expensive. The best thing to do is find a tariff that strikes the right balance for your usage and circumstances.

If you think you would be better off on a no standing charge tariff, you can contact us to discuss your options.

Do standing charges apply on a prepayment meter?

Yes. The standing charge is subtracted from your credit every day. If you’re going away on holiday, it’s important that you leave enough credit on your meter to cover the standing charge.

Also be aware that if you run out of credit the standing charge will still be applied, building up a debt if you don’t pay it back.

Do standing charges apply on a smart meter?

The standing charge is determined by your tariff, not the type of meter you have – so it doesn’t make any difference if you have a standard meter or a smart meter. We have answered some common questions about smart meters in this article.

 

Do you feel you are paying too much for your gas and electricity? Eversmart offer some of the most competitive energy prices in the industry – you can get a quote in under 2 minutes here.