Ten of the World’s Greenest Football Stadiums

Green football stadiums

The 2018 World Cup kicks off in Russia later this month, so what better time to take a look at some of the most eco-friendly, energy efficient football stadiums in the world.

Stadium owners around the globe have been making big steps to cut the environmental impact of these huge energy-hungry buildings, from covering roofs in solar panels to recovering & recycling rainwater. And it’s not just national stadiums and top-flight clubs that are going green – one non-league English team features on our list, with one of the most eco-friendly football grounds in the world!

You can check out the full list in the infographic below. If you would like to re-publish it on your own website or blog, we have included some easy embed codes at the bottom.

(Click or tap on the image for a better view).

Green Football Stadiums - Infographic by Eversmart Energy

Use this infographic on your own website

Simply copy & paste the below code into your website editor.

<img src="https://www.eversmartenergy.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/green-stadiums-infographic.jpg" alt="Green Football Stadiums - Infographic by Eversmart Energy" width="800" height="7779" /> <p>Infographic by <a href="https://www.eversmartenergy.co.uk/">Eversmart Energy</a></p>

Scotland sets new 90% carbon reduction target

Edinburgh

The Scottish government has pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 90% by 2050. This exceeds the UK’s overall target of 80%, making it one of the most ambitious climate change targets in the world.

The Climate Change Bill

The Climate Change Bill, which was introduced last week, sets out to cut emissions by 90% compared to 1990 levels. The Scottish government says that the 90% target is “at the very limit of feasibility”, but that they are eager to push the target right up to 100% as soon as realistically possible. At this point the country would achieve “net-zero” emissions – where 100% of the carbon released into the atmosphere is captured or offset.

  • The Scottish government claims that the Climate Change Bill is the toughest and most ambitious in the world
  • Scotland will include a fair share of all international aviation and shipping in its targets
  • The targets will cover all greenhouse gasses – such as methane and nitrogen oxides – not just carbon dioxide
  • As soon as the technology exists to deliver the 100% target, it will be written into law

Scotland’s track-record

Scotland has an impressive track-record when it comes the climate change targets. The country has already reduced emissions by 38% since 1990 – Sweden and Finland are the only industrialised European nations that have done better.

Its unique climate and geology means that Scotland can generate large amounts of renewable energy, particularly from wind and hyrdo. In 2015, renewable sources accounted for over half of Scotland’s electricity consumption.

The Scottish Parliament building

Criticism

Some climate change campaigners have criticised the bill for not being ambitious enough, stating that the 100% target needs to be brought forward in order to meet the terms of the Paris Climate Agreement.

Scottish ministers have pointed out that they took on independent advice from the UK Committee on Climate Change, and that the current target is at the limit of what is feasible right now.

Scottish environment secretary Roseanna Cunningham said that: “Our climate change bill sets out our commitment to reduce emissions by 100 per cent with ambitious interim targets which strengthen Scotland’s world-leading position on climate change.”

“Our 90 per cent target will be tougher even than the 100 per cent goal set by a handful of other countries, because our legislation will set more demanding, legally-binding, annual targets covering every sector of our economy.”

“By 2030, we will cut emissions by two-thirds and, unlike other nations, we will not use carbon offsetting, where other countries are paid to cut emissions for us, to achieve our goal.”

How do I find out who my gas and electricity supplier is?

How do I find out who my gas and electricity supplier is?

Have you just moved, or are about to move house? Or perhaps you’ve simply lost track of your paperwork. Whatever the reason, sometimes you need to find out which company supplies your gas and electricity. There are various ways to find out who your energy supplier is – read on to find out.

Before you do anything else… find a bill

It sounds obvious, but before you try anything else, see if you can dig out an old bill or letter from your energy provider. If you manage to get your hands on one, it should have the name and/or logo of your supplier on it, along with their contact details. It may also be worth searching through your old emails.

Obviously this won’t work if you have just moved house. If you’re moving into a rented property, there’s a chance your landlord or letting agency may know who your current supplier is.

If you still can’t find out, move on to one of the methods below.

Finding your gas supplier

Finding out who supplies your gas is easy – you just need to call the Meter Point Administration Service (also known as the Meter Number Helpline). Tell them your postcode and first line of your address, and they will give you the name of your current supplier along with your Meter Point Reference Number (MPRN).

Their number is 0870 608 1524.

The Meter Point Administration Service operates nationwide and calls are charged at 7p per minute.

Finding your electricity supplier

To find out who your electricity supplier is, you will need to call your local distribution company. The number you call will depend on which region of the country you live in – take a look at the map below to find out who to call in your area.

Finding your local distribution company
Call your local distribution company to find out who supplies your electricity. Click on the image to expand.

Here’s a list of distribution companies along with their phone numbers:

Region Distribution Company Phone Number
Northern Scotland Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks 0800 048 3515
Central & Southern Scotland SP Energy Networks 0330 1010 300
North East England & Yorkshire: Northern Powergrid 0800 011 3332
North West England Electricity North West 0800 195 4141
Merseyside, Cheshire, North Wales & North Shropshire SP Energy Networks 0330 1010 300
East Midlands & West Midlands Western Power Distribution 0800 096 3080
South Wales & South West England Western Power Distribution 0800 096 3080
London, South East England & Eastern England UK Power Networks 0845 601 4516
Southern England Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks 0800 048 3516
Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Electricity Networks 03457 643 643
Republic of Ireland ESB Networks 00353 1850 372 757

The distributor will tell you the name of your electricity supplier as well as your Meter Point Administration Number (MPAN). The cost of the call varies depending on which number you need to call.

 

While you’re here… Are you thinking about switching energy suppliers? You could save up to £300 per month by switching to Eversmart – get a quote here.

The shifting trends in global energy use

global energy architecture

The way the world generates its energy is shifting dramatically, as populations grow and demand in developing nations increases. In the 21st century alone global energy demand has almost doubled, creating challenges for governments and energy producers worldwide.

The blogging team at Roof Stores have sifted through the data and created a fascinating infographic that puts the big numbers into perspective and highlights some surprising trends and patterns.

Take a look at the full infographic below and let us know your thoughts in the comments!

global energy architecture infographic

How to save energy when you drive

energy saving driving

The home isn’t the only place where you can save energy. According to a study by the AA, you can save as much as 33% on fuel just by making a few changes to your driving habits.

Check your tyres

As well as being dangerous, worn or under-inflated tyres can reduce fuel efficiency. Check your tyre pressure regularly – especially before a long journey.

Check your oil

Make sure you have the right amount of oil in your engine (especially if you own an older vehicle) and be sure to use the correct type of oil. Check your manufacturer’s handbook if you are unsure which specification you should be using.

Get your car serviced regularly

Most manufacturers recommend getting your car serviced every twelve months or every 12,000 miles, whichever comes first.

Lose weight

The more weight your car is carrying, the more fuel you will use. If an item doesn’t need to be in your car, leave it at home.

Your car doesn’t need to warm up

This is an old practice that belongs in the past. Experts say that modern engines need no more than 30 seconds to warm up, and that your car will warm up more quickly when it’s moving anyway. There’s no need to start the car several minutes before travelling – doing so will simply waste fuel.

Scrape ice in the winter

Using a scraper or a de-icer spray is better than leaving the car idling and waiting for the ice to melt.

Plan ahead

Getting lost and/or stuck in slow moving traffic wastes fuel. Plan your route and check the traffic news before setting off on a long journey.

Smoothly does it

Rapid starting and stopping eats up a lot of fuel. Pull away gently, look ahead and anticipate hazards to avoid harsh braking. Try to avoid coming to a complete stop by approaching junctions slowly and looking ahead.

Change gear early

The AA recommends changing gear when your revs reach around 2,000 rpm (in a diesel car) or 2,500 (petrol).

Be careful with the air con

Turning on the air conditioning causes your car to use more fuel. At low speeds, it may be better to just open a window instead. Save the air con for higher speeds, where opening a window would create extra drag and hamper your fuel efficiency.

Turn off unnecessary electrics

Your car’s electrical systems draw power from the battery, which in turn is charged-up by using fuel. Turn off things like lights, window heaters and de-misters if you don’t need them.

Things you shouldn’t do:

Coasting – Some people believe that rolling along out of gear will save fuel. According to the AA, the fuel savings are negligible (especially in modern cars) and it’s dangerous, as you don’t have full control of the vehicle.

Turning off your engine instead of idling – This is only advisable if you expect to be stopped for over 3 minutes (for example at a level crossing or in heavily gridlocked traffic), your engine is warm, and you have a good battery. Otherwise, the extra fuel needed to start your engine again will negate any fuel saved by switching it off. It’s also not kind to your battery.

Over to you!

Do you have any eco-driving tips of your own? Let us know in the comments section.

The UK just went three days without using coal power

coal power

The UK has just gone for a record-breaking 3 days without using any electricity from burning coal. The last time that happened was in the 19th century!

The country was runnng on nuclear, gas and renewables for a total of 76 hours, smashing the previous record of 55 hours set just last week, and far exceeding the 24-hour coal-free period from last April.

Demand for energy dropped during the recent period of warm weather, allowing other sources to cover the country’s needs without having to rely on ‘dirty’ power from coal.

According to the National Grid, gas power did most of the heavy lifting during the 3 day period, providing just over 30% of the total power used. Wind power came in second place with 25%, followed by nuclear at 23%. Other sources (including imported energy from Europe and biomass generation) accounted for around 15%. Solar power came in last with 6%.

UK electricty mix

Drop in demand

Coal power did experience a temporary spike in demand during the recent cold snap caused by the ‘beast from the east’. An increase in gas being used for heating reduced the amount available for power generation, causing coal power plants to come online.

Despite this, experts are expecting an overall drop in demand for coal, with the National Grid forecasting lower demand this summer compared to 2017, and two coal plants expected to close later this year.

Industry experts are optimistic that we will hit more renewable energy milestones in the coming year. “Ever rising renewable capacity in the UK will see these records fall more and more frequently, clearly showing progress made over the past decade or two,” said Jonathan Marshall, an analyst at the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit.

10 simple ways to save energy around the home

energy saving tip

Saving energy doesn’t have to be difficult – following these 10 simple tips will help you cut your energy bills and reduce your carbon footprint!

Switch to energy saving light bulbs

They may be a little more expensive, but energy saving bulbs last much longer and will save you money in the long-run. Replacing all of the traditional light bulbs in your home with LED lamps of the same brightness will save you around £35 per year!

Turn off the lights when you leave the room

Lights are responsible for around 7% of the total electricity used in the average home. If you can get into the habit of turning off the lights whenever you leave a room, you can really take a bite out of your energy bill!

Use a washing up bowl

It sounds incredibly simple, but using a bowl when you do the dishes (instead of keeping the hot tap running) can knock around £25 off your annual gas bill and £30 off your water bill, according to the Energy Saving Trust.

Wait until it’s full

Don’t turn on your washing machine or dishwasher until they are nice and full. Doing so will significantly reduce your electricity and water bills.

Turn appliances off at the wall

Putting your electrical appliances on standby mode isn’t the same as turning them off at the wall. Even though they look like they are off, TVs, computers, games consoles etc. will continue draining power in when left on standby. Make a habit of flicking the switch on the socket.

Don’t overfill the kettle

The UK has a nasty habit of boiling too much water when making a cuppa, resulting in £68 million of wasted energy each year. Next time you make a brew, only heat the amount of water you need – or better yet, get a smaller kettle.

Set your fridge to the right temperature

Most fridges have a thermostat – find out where it is and set it to the right temperature. Your fridge should be between 3 and 5°C, and your freezer should be around -18 °C.

Take it easy with the oven

Pre-heating your oven doesn’t take as long as some people think – around 10-15 minutes is just fine. Turning it on earlier just wastes energy. You can also turn the oven off a few minutes before the end of your cooking time (especially if it’s electric).

Take a shower

Showers are far more efficient than baths, in terms of water and gas usage. If everybody in a family of four replaced one bath a week with a quick shower, you could save up to £20 a year on gas bills and £20 on water.

Get a Smart Meter

A smart meter gives you a near real-time view of your energy usage and will help you identify & cut out energy waste. You can get a free smart meter fitted by a trained engineer when you switch to Eversmart – find out more here.

 

Sources

http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/home-energy-efficiency/lighting
http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/home-energy-efficiency/saving-water
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23175220